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Syracuse Journal-Democrat - Syracuse, NE
The Rev. Tim Schenck, rector of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass., looks for God amid domestic chaos
What is a condiment castor
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About this blog
Tim Schenck is an Episcopal priest, husband to Bryna, father to Benedict and Zachary, and \x34master\x34 to Delilah (about 50 in dog years). Since 2009 I've been the rector of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass. (on the ...
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Father Tim
Tim Schenck is an Episcopal priest, husband to Bryna, father to Benedict and Zachary, and \x34master\x34 to Delilah (about 50 in dog years). Since 2009 I've been the rector of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass. (on the South Shore of Boston). I've also served parishes in Maryland and New York. When I'm not tending to my parish, hanging out with my family, or writing, I can usually be found drinking good coffee -- not that drinking coffee and these other activities are mutually exclusive. I hope you'll visit my website at www.frtim.com to find out more about me, read some excerpts from my book \x34What Size are God's Shoes: Kids, Chaos & the Spiritual Life\x34 (Morehouse, 2008), and check out some recent sermons.
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Gail Wurtele



The Victorians would set a castor on the table with the condiments in an array of bottles.









Never heard of it, what is a condiment castor anyway?



 



 



The Victorians would set a castor on the table with the condiments in an array of bottles. The stand was often silver plate or sterling with “chased” designs on the edges and fanciful figures on the base and handle. The bottles themselves were very beautiful being made of cut glass or pattern glass in many designs and colors. Most stands held bottles with stoppers for oil and one for vinegar, a covered jar with a small opening for a tiny spoon for the dry mustard and a salt and pepper. These bottles fit in holes in the stand so all could be passed at once.



















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Back in the 1890’s a simple caster or castor could be purchased for the whopping sum of $4.00. This same piece would be over a hundred were you to find a set in good condition. If you want one of the more beautiful and precious sets you will pay a precious price!



 



 



Thanks to the generosity of C. Wayne Ware of Cedar Falls, Ia. a caster set has been added to the collections at Wildwood Historic Center for all to see and enjoy when they tour the home of Jasper Anderson Ware.

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